Barbecue Grills: Now We're Cooking With Gas

The history of barbecuing dates back long before the United States was founded, and tract houses with backyard barbecue grills spread across the suburban plains. It is said, even though some disagree, that the Taino Indians of Haiti were the first to use a form of barbecuing over open fire. In years to follow, English Settlers along the Atlantic Coast had their own barbecues. It is said in the year 1733, a gentleman by the name of Benjamin Lynda wrote in his diary, Fair and hot; barbecue at the Browns, which indicates social gathering was established at that time.

Today barbecuing is far reaching and especially grand sized in Texas, where a pit for fuel might be dug ten foot deep. Barbecue grills tend to be small in comparison and portable, fueled by charcoal, propane, or electricity. The smaller charcoal grills are best suited for two to four people, the thing with charcoal is the wait, sometimes twenty minutes or more before the coals are ready for grilling. Many barbecue purists argue that charcoal gives the food a better taste than the gas grills. There may have been some truth to this in the early days, but with the gas grills of today the food picks up flavor from the drippings on a cover over the burners, called a flavorizer bar, much the same as from the charcoal. I think most would agree once they got used to it, that you would be hard pressed to tell the difference, all other things being equal.

Once you decide to purchase a gas barbecue grill, several things should be considered. Size will depend on how often, and how many, you will be grilling for. The three or four burner models will handle almost any grilling to be done at home for the average family. If there is a side burner on the grill it will come in handy for completing all of your cooking outdoors. A couple of other things to consider are how well the grill is made. Some of the cheaper grills are made of very thin material, and will only last a few years. The burners on the cheaper grills suffer the same shortcomings, and will not last long if the grill is left outside. You might want to take a look at stainless steel barbecue grill with the cast iron, ceramic, or stainless steel burners. These will last much longer, and should give many years of trouble free use if well taken care of. Be sure to get a custom grill cover too, as this will keep your purchase looking like new for many years to come.

You might also want to add a few items such as a cookie glove, long handled fork, and maybe a long handle spatula. A grill brush for cleaning will also be helpful. Another item to consider is an extra propane bottle. It is a wise purchase since you will only run out of gas when you are using your grill. Also worth noting is that all propane and natural gas grills can be hooked to a permanent supply line if desired. Check with your local gas company for assistance.

If grilling is new to you, you will find yourself cooking outside more than you ever imagined. I personally cook outdoors on many occasions year-round. There is just nothing like a home cooked meal on your new barbecue grill. Happy Grilling!